A Memorable Retirement Observance

This past Sunday, March 31, Salem Lutheran Church in Tomball, Tex. observed the retirement of Pastor Doug Dommer and his wife Delo. Doug had served Salem for 38 years in a number of roles in support of two senior pastors, Wayne Graumann and Tim Niekerk.

The celebration was inspirational. It began with an informal hour of sharing by women and men who had known and worked with Doug over the years. Speakers included one of his brothers; a couple young pastors whom Doug had influenced and mentored over the years; a woman staff member who introduced video reflections of Doug’s sermons and gave her own testimony of Doug’s support and encouragement for women using their God-given gifts; and his former senior pastor. Terry and I were invited to honor Doug’s wife Delo, a wonderfully gifted and talented woman.

That informal hour was followed by a service of worship during which Doug preached his farewell sermon, reflecting on his years at Salem and focusing on Philippians 1:3-6: I thank my God every time I remember you. In every prayer for all of you, I always pray with joy, because of your partnership in the gospel from the first day until now, being confident of this, that He who began a good work in you will continue to perfect it until the day of Christ Jesus.

A few memorable points from his sermon are these:

God’s grace always precedes our peace.
Many churches eat their pastors alive. Salem loves their pastors to death.
The work we do is God’s work. He began it. He will perfect it.

One of the most moving parts of the service was the final hymn, A Mighty Fortress. Immediately after the conclusion of the sermon, Doug went straight to the organ bench and played this hymn as I’d never before heard it played. By anyone. With no notes. Majestically. Worshipfully. Powerfully. Inspirationally. A mighty fortress is our God … the Kingdom’s ours forever!

The concluding moments included words of appreciation and affirmation from senior pastor Tim Niekerk, along with presentation of a cash gift. The amount was not disclosed, but the presentation left no doubt that its purpose was for the purchase of a new automobile.

During these two separate activities, appreciation for Doug’s ministry and Delo’s partnership was articulately and emotionally expressed. Yet throughout the morning it was clear that the real appreciation was directed toward our gracious God … Father, Son, Holy Spirit … for the gifts Doug and Delo have received and the way they have used them to be a blessing to the thousands of people they have influenced for Christ during their 38 years at Salem.

Well done, good and faithful servants!

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Estate Planning Myth #1

In my work with Legacy Deo I talk to people about estate planning. Creating a plan is an important step for every person to take, regardless of age or financial status. It can be done by using a variety of methods of current planning for future gifts to family and charitable causes.

Almost every day I encounter people who have misconceptions about how, what, where, when, and why estate planning should occur. Accordingly, a large part of what I do is help people understand what is mythical and what is factual about estate planning.

This week I’m beginning a series on Estate Planning Myths, sharing one each month. Here’s Myth #1: “I’m not wealthy enough to consider planned giving. I just don’t have a large enough estate to worry about planning for the distribution of my assets when I die.”

Here’s the fact: Regardless of the size of your estate, what you have is God’s gift to you. As people entrusted with the management of whatever we have received as a blessing from God, you and I have the responsibility of carefully and prayerfully planning the distribution of what we have to the people and the causes we love.

Read the parable Jesus told in Matthew 25:14-30 about the varying amounts of money entrusted to the care of each of a master’s three servants. We’re not all equally blessed. What we do with what we have is important, no matter how much we have or don’t have.

Every heartfelt gift you and I make to our family and to our church or other charitable cause is helpful, no matter the size of the gift.

So whether your possessions are worth $10,000 or $10,000,000, take the steps necessary to be sure they are efficiently and effectively passed on according to your wishes.

That’s the essence of estate planning, also called planned giving. Legacy Deo can help!

Contact us at info@legacydeo.org or call us at (800) 880-3733 or (512) 646-4909 for a free Wills Planning Guide. You’ll be glad you did!

Advice to Retired Pastors

Retirement

Today’s article is titled Advice to Retired Pastors and Their Relationship to the New Pastors in Their Former Congregations by Rev. Fred C. Jacobi.

While you and I might not agree totally with these suggestions, they are worthy of consideration. I also understand that some pastors are easier to follow than others and that some succession plans simply don’t work as well as intended. Here we go:

  1. Stay away from the parish at least six months to a year, allowing the new man to “settle in.”
  2. Don’t attend Church Council or Voters Meetings. That’s the reason you retired!
  3. Refer all weddings, baptisms, funerals, etc. to the new pastor. The worst thing that can happen is for him to know you did something behind his back.
  4. If you attend a Bible Class he is conducting, keep a low profile.
  5. Treat him as your Pastor.
  6. Do not criticize him behind his back. You may think you have said something in confidence, but most often he will hear about it. He will obviously have some faults, but so did you!
  7. Do something that advances the ministry. Help with shut-in calls or become a Stephen minister.
  8. Treat him with respect.
  9. Let the vision and new ideas come from him and the church leadership – not from you.
  10. Feel free to help out with leading worship at other churches.
  11. If the new man feels uncomfortable with anything you are doing, back off!
  12. Sit down with him and assess your relationship from time to time.
  13. Allow him to do spiritual advising as much as possible.
  14. Keep him and his family in your prayers.
  15. Remember that each new pastor builds on the work of former pastors. Don’t allow members to extol their favorite pastor to the detriment of others.
  16. Enjoy your former congregation members, but remember they are friends, not your parishioners!
  17. Do everything possible to make the transition a smooth one.
  18. Go along with his new ideas about worship and ministry. Variety is the spice of life.
  19. Don’t talk about the way you used to do things.
  20. Do everything with a humble spirit.