An Airplane Captain’s Memorial Day Story

Dignified Transfer at Dover AFB

My lead flight attendant came to me and said, “We have an H.R. on this flight.” (H.R. stands for human remains.) “Are they military?” I asked. “Yes,” she said. I asked, “Is there an escort?” She replied, “Yes, I’ve already assigned him a seat.” I said, “Please tell him to come to the Flight Deck. You can board him early.”

A short while later a young army sergeant entered the flight deck. He was the image of the perfectly dressed soldier. He introduced himself and I asked him about his soldier.

The escorts of these fallen soldiers talk about them as if they are still alive and still with us. “My soldier is on his way back to Virginia,” he said. He proceeded to answer my questions, but offered no additional words.

I asked him if there was anything I could do for him and he said no. I told him that he had the toughest job in the military, and that I appreciated the work he does for the families of our fallen soldiers. The first officer and I got up out of our seats to shake his hand. He left the Flight Deck to find his seat.

We completed our preflight checks, pushed back, and performed an uneventful departure. About 30 minutes into our flight I received a call from the lead flight attendant in the cabin.

“I just found out the family of the soldier we are carrying is also on board,” she said. She then proceeded to tell me that the father, mother, wife and two-year-old daughter were escorting their son, husband, and father home. The family was upset because they were unable to see the container that the soldier was in before we left.

We were on our way to a major hub at which the family was going to wait four hours for the connecting flight home to Virginia. The father of the soldier told the flight attendant that knowing his son was below him in the cargo compartment and being unable to see him was too much for him and the family to bear. He had asked the flight attendant if there was anything that could be done to allow them to see him upon our arrival. The family wanted to be outside by the cargo door to watch the soldier being taken off the airplane.

I could hear the desperation in the flight attendant’s voice when she asked me if there was anything I could do. “I’m on it,” I said, and told her that I would get back to her.

Airborne communication with my company normally occurs in the form of electronic messages. I decided to bypass this system and contact my flight dispatcher directly on a secondary   radio. There is a radio operator in the operations control center who connects you to the dispatcher’s telephone. I was in direct contact with the dispatcher and explained the situation I had on board with the family and what the family wanted. He said he understood and that he would get back to me.

Two hours went by and I had not heard from the dispatcher. We were going to get busy soon and I needed to know what to tell the family, so I sent a text message asking for an update. I saved the return message from the dispatcher. Here is the text:

“Captain, sorry it has taken so long to get back to you. There is policy on this now, and I had to check on a few things. Upon your arrival a dedicated escort team will meet the aircraft. The team will escort the family to the ramp and plane side. A van will be used to load the remains with a secondary van for the family.”

“The family will be taken to their departure area and escorted into the terminal, where the remains can be seen on the ramp. It is a private area for the family only. When the connecting aircraft arrives, the family will be escorted onto the ramp and plane side to watch the remains being loaded for the final leg home. Captain, most of us here in flight control are veterans. Please pass our condolences on to the family. Thanks.”

I sent a message back, telling flight control thanks for a good job. I printed out the message and gave it to the lead flight attendant to pass on to the father. The lead flight attendant was very thankful and told me, “You have no idea how much this will mean to them.”

Things started getting busy for the descent, approach, and landing. After landing we cleared the runway and taxied to the ramp area. The ramp is huge with 15 gates on either side of the alleyway. It is always a busy area with aircraft maneuvering every which way to enter and exit. When we entered the ramp and checked in with the ramp controller, we were told that all traffic was being held for us.

“There is a team in place to meet the aircraft,” we were told. It looked like it was all coming together but then I realized that once we turned the seat belt sign off, everyone would stand up at once and delay the family from getting off the airplane. As we approached our gate, I asked the copilot to tell the ramp controller we were going to stop short of the gate to make an announcement to the passengers. He did that and the ramp controller said, “Take your time.”

I stopped the aircraft and set the parking brake. I pushed the public address button and said: “Ladies and gentleman, this is your Captain speaking. I have stopped short of our gate to make a special announcement. We have a passenger on board who deserves our honor and respect. His name is Private XXXXXX, a soldier who recently lost his life. Private XXXXXX is under your feet in the cargo hold. Escorting him today is Army Sergeant XXXXXX.  Also on board are his father, mother, wife, and daughter. Your entire flight crew is asking for all passengers to remain in their seats to allow the family to exit the aircraft first. Thank you.”

We continued the turn to the gate, came to a stop and started our shutdown procedures. A couple minutes later I opened the cockpit door and found the two forward flight attendants crying, something you just do not see. I was told that after we came to a stop, every passenger on the aircraft stayed in their seats, waiting for the family to exit the aircraft.

When the family got up and gathered their things, a passenger slowly started to clap his hands. Moments later, more passengers joined in and soon the entire aircraft was clapping. Words like “God bless you.” “I’m so sorry.” “Thank you.” “Be proud.” and other kind words were uttered to the family as they made their way down the aisle and out of the airplane. They were escorted down to the ramp to finally be with their loved one.

Many of the passengers thanked me for the announcement I had made. “They were just words,” I told them. “I could say them over and over again, but nothing I say will bring back that brave soldier.”

On this Memorial Day weekend I respectfully ask that all of you reflect on this event and the sacrifices many of our nation’s men and women have made to ensure our freedom and safety in these United States of America.

At such a time as this, the words of Jesus are amazingly powerful: “Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.” John 15:13

Troubles and Worries

Worry

Today’s quote is from Edward Everett Hale: “Never bear more than one kind of trouble at a time. Some people bear three kinds—all they have had in the past, all they have now, and all they expect to have in the future.”

This quote reminds me of the game of golf. It’s so hard to forget the terrible shot you just made and tempting to worry about the one you’ll be facing after the one you’re fixin’ to make.

But here’s the reality. You can’t undo the shot you just made. It is what it is. If it’s in the cactus, it’s in the cactus. Deal with it! And you don’t know what shot you’ll be required to make after you get out of the cactus. So all you can do now is just be sure you get out of the cactus!

Life is very much the same. What happened yesterday or last year or 50 years ago, happened. It cannot be undone. Deal with it! If it was the result of sin, ask God for forgiveness. And trust his promise written by the apostle Paul: “Through the blood of his Son, we are set free from our sins. God forgives our failures through the riches of his grace (overflowing kindness).” (Eph. 1:7)

And there’s no way to know what’s gonna’ happen in the future, so there’s absolutely no positive result to be gained by worrying about what might happen tomorrow. Just take care of today.

Jesus gave that advice a long time ago in his Sermon on the Mount. He was talking about the futility of worrying about life, food, drink, or clothing. He told his listeners about God’s provision for the flowers of the field and the birds of the air.

And then he said: “So do not worry … your heavenly Father knows you need these things. But seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well. Do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.” (Matt. 6:31-34)

God’s peace be with you!

+Dr. Jean Garton+ and +Dr. Betty Duda+

screen-shot-2016-12-28-at-8-21-15-pm

Near the conclusion of the Year of Our Lord 2016, I share the news of the passing of two very dear sisters in Christ, Dr. Jean Garton and Dr. Betty Duda. Jean went to heaven Friday, Dec. 23 and Betty followed on Saturday, Dec. 24. They now rest in peace, free from the illnesses that beset them, rejoicing eternally at the throne of the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world.

Each of these gifted women served The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod faithfully, tirelessly, humbly, and courageously in numerous capacities:

  • Jean became a world-renowned expert on pro-life issues, testifying before the U.S. Congress. She wrote the book Who Broke the Baby?and traveled the world speaking before royalty, government leaders and even at gatherings of three or four people to deliver the message God entrusted to her. Jean was the first woman to serve on an LCMS board — the Board for Public Relations, and chaired the LCMS Task Force on Women, President’s Commission on Women, Office of Government Information Advisory Council, and Task Force on Ministry with Families.
  • Possessing significant leadership and organizational skills, Betty served as president of the national Lutheran Women’s Missionary League, the Florida-Georgia District LWML, and as chair of the boards of Concordia College New York, Lutheran World Relief, and Lutheran Association of Missionaries and Pilots. She also served on the boards of Concordia University Chicago, Concordia University Minnesota, Wheat Ridge Foundation, Aid Association for Lutherans, People of the Book Lutheran Outreach, and Mill Neck Manor. In addition, she was a board member of numerous Florida civic organizations, chairing many of them.

Both Jean and Betty also served a number of years together on the Board of Directors of The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod. Their support, encouragement, and dedicated service during my term of office as LCMS president were remarkable, especially during a time of stress and conflict in our beloved Synod. They steadfastly espoused an evangelical direction for our beloved Synod for which I will always remain deeply respectful and truly grateful.

At a significant point in his life Old Testament King David acknowledged in prayer to God: “We are here for only a moment, visitors and strangers in the land as our ancestors were before us. Our days on earth are like a passing shadow, gone so soon without a trace.” (1 Chron. 29:15)

And Jesus said to Martha: “I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in me will live, even though he dies. And whoever lives and believes in me will never die.” (John 11:25-26)

Terry and I thank God for Jean Garton and Betty Duda. This year they celebrated the birth of our Lord Jesus in a manner you and I can only imagine! It’s a celebration that knows no ending!

+Vernon Dale Gundermann+

vern-gundermannAfter a valiant battle with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), more commonly called Lou Gehrig’s disease, Rev. Vernon Dale Gundermann left this earthly life on Friday, September 16. He was 78 years, 11 months and 16 days of age.

Vern served for many years as pastor of Concordia Lutheran Church in Kirkwood, Missouri. Among other positions, after retirement he also served as Chaplain at the International Center of The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod (LCMS).

My first contact with Pastor Gundermann was in 1991, when I was elected president of the Texas District of the LCMS. The 41 members of the Council of Presidents met at the International Center, near Concordia, so most of us walked to church for the 8:00 a.m. Sunday service.

We were privileged to receive assurance of God’s love and forgiveness from the heart, head and hands of Vern Gundermann, who had become Senior Pastor at Concordia that same year. He always seemed incredibly sensitive, spiritually mature and pastorally competent.

In addition, the man could preach! I’ve come to describe Vern as one of the best preachers in The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod. I never heard a bad sermon from this man and can think of few other preachers, including myself, about whom I can say the same.

Vern was also a sensitive and caring pastor. Particularly during some difficult days as national church president, I received communications from and attended meetings with people who my dear Terry aptly describes as “joy suckers.” They sucked the joy right out of life and ministry.

At such times, Pastor Gundermann had an uncanny, surreal, perhaps even supernatural way of knowing and feeling the struggles we were experiencing. Upon returning from such difficult meetings and encounters, I was almost always greeted with a phone message from Pastor Gundermann, assuring me, and Terry as well, of his prayers, love, support, encouragement.

Vern is survived by his beloved wife Betty, their four children, and 11 grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at Concordia Lutheran Church, Kirkwood, MO, on Sunday, September 25, at 4:00 p.m. and at St. Paul Lutheran Church, Fulda, MN, on Tuesday, September 27, at 1:30 p.m.

Well done, good and faithful servant!

The strife is o’er, the battle done; now is the victor’s triumph won; now be the song of praise begun. Alleluia!

Lord, by the stripes which wounded Thee, from death’s dread sting Thy servants free, that we may live and sing to Thee. Alleluia!

Memorial Service for +Ralph Arthur Bohlmann+

Ralph BohlmannFor God So Loved the World (John 3:16-17)

Jesus said: “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.  For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world might be saved through him. 

I Am the Way, and the Truth, and the Life (John 14:1-3, 6)

Jesus also said: “Let not your hearts be troubled. Believe in God; believe also in me. In my Father’s house are many rooms. If it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you? And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and will take you to myself, that where I am you may be also… I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.”

Grace, mercy, and peace, from God our Father and from our Lord Jesus Christ!

The first time I saw Ralph Bohlmann was at the national LCMS convention in Dallas in 1977. He was a distinguished looking man who spoke eloquently, evangelically and pastorally about a matter of great importance. I was quite impressed with his obvious leadership skill and ability. Little did I know what the Lord had in store for him and littler did I know what the Lord had in store for me. I certainly never expected to be here today.

During our years in St. Louis from 2001-2010, Terry and I were together with Ralph and his wife Pat on a number of enjoyable occasions. I also had the privilege of taking Dr. Bohlmann to lunch on his birthday, almost annually. Often Sam Nafzger was with us. Both are theological giants whose friendship I will always cherish.

The occasion that brings us to this place on this day at this hour is the death of a man who was dearly loved and deeply respected by many. His service as parish pastor, CTCR leader, professor and president of Concordia Seminary in St. Louis and president of The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod demonstrated humility, integrity, keen intellect and a heart for the Gospel of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.

In addition, notwithstanding the attention and accolades bestowed upon those who serve in such positions of responsibility and notoriety, Ralph Bohlmann took seriously his duties as husband, father and grandfather. Like many of us in public ministry of any kind, the stresses and stretches on his time and energy no doubt at least occasionally and perhaps more often than he would have liked, demanded his attention, diverted his priorities and diluted the quality of time spent with his wife, his children and grandchildren. Many of us can identify with that from our own personal experience!

Be that as it may, Ralph Bohlmann dearly loved his wife Pat, their son Paul, their daughter Lynn, and their grandsons Jesse and Lucas. You are the ones most personally affected by the death of a man you knew as Dad and Grandpa. You are the ones who will miss the sound of his voice on the phone, the warmth of the hugs he shared when you were together and the security of knowing he was there to lean on in times when only a father or grandfather can provide what’s needed. But now he’s gone. He died.

That’s a painful statement! He died. It’s a dark mystery, this thing called death. How can it be that one moment a person is warm, animated, conversant, mobile and alive, while the very next moment the body of that same person is cold, still, silent, vacant and dead? How can it be that a beautiful woman or a handsome man can over time deteriorate into a pile of dust and a box of bones?

The most helpful insight I’ve ever heard about life and death came from my own daughter, when she was three years old. As I stepped out of the shower in preparation for the funeral of a beloved member of the congregation I was serving at the time, I was greeted by little Angie, who asked the thoughtfully perceptive question: “Daddy, when a person dies does he take off his body?”

For a moment I was completely stumped, by my three year old daughter! As I reflected and recovered, I replied: “Yes! That’s exactly what happens when a person dies!” And to this day, over 40 years later, I still turn to that insightful understanding when death occurs.

The ancients used to think of life as consisting of three parts: body, soul and spirit. In my simple way of thinking, it’s hard to distinguish between soul and spirit, so I simply speak of body and soul or body and spirit. To me, the most easily understandable explanation of life is that everyone has a body in which that person’s soul or spirit, that person’s real being, resides as long as he or she is living on this earth. When death occurs, that person’s soul or spirit leaves the body behind and moves on. Angie had it right. The person who dies takes off his or her body and leaves it behind.

That’s what’s in this box. The physical body inherited and inhabited by the soul, the spirit, the real being, the true essence of the man we knew as Ralph Bohlmann, Dad, Grandpa. This body was baptized in the Name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. This body was the home of a soul redeemed by the blood of Christ. This body was the temple of the Holy Spirit. This body contained the man Ralph Bohlmann, who lived his life as both saint and sinner.

So then, where in the world has the real being gone, the soul or spirit of Ralph Bohlmann that animated his body for 84 years? Jesus himself answers that question: 16 “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.” (John 3:16)

That’s the answer. The real being that resided in this body for over eight decades has gone to eternal life. Eternal life. Ever wonder what that’s like? I have. And still do. Eternal means everlasting, undying, perpetual, endless, ceaseless, timeless, infinite, immortal, and never ending.

My brain says “Hold it! That doesn’t compute! I can’t begin to comprehend how life can never end because my experience this side of heaven tells me that everyone I’ve ever known has had or will have, at some point in time, an ending.” I simply cannot understand how someone can go on living or existing forever. But that’s the promise of God. Believing that promise gives me hope.

The words of Jesus read a few moments ago give us not only hope but also assurance. God so loved the world … How much did he love the world? So much that he gave … his Son … his only Son. And unless you’re unfamiliar with the basic beliefs of Christianity, you know what that gift cost God the Father—the very life of his only Son, Jesus.

Terry and I have a son. I love him very much. I love him and the other members of my family more than I love anyone else in the world. I don’t love the world enough to give up my son. I’m not God. God is God. And God gave his Son to this world for a purpose.

St. John writes: “For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world might be saved through him.” What would cause God to love the world and its inhabitants, even the most unlovable person you can think of, so much that he would send his Son to a painful death on the cross for the life and salvation of the world and everyone in it?

The Bible says “God is love.” (1 John 4:16) A God of love is constrained to do what he is. Parents love their children and are willing to do anything to protect and save them from harm and danger. God is our Father. He loves us. He was willing to do anything to save and protect us from eternal condemnation, even to sacrifice his Son on the altar of a cross.

The sacrifice Jesus paid is the sacrifice that ended all sacrifices. Instead of bringing animals to temples to be killed so their blood can be sprinkled on the altar and their flesh consumed with fire to gain the attention of God in heaven so he will look down with favor upon his sinful people, as the Old Testament people were commanded to do, we look to Jesus, the Lamb of God. His death on the cross has taken away the sin of the world, once and for all and assures eternal life for all who accept this free gift!

Jesus spoke of his love for the world: “Let not your hearts be troubled. Believe in God; believe also in me. In my Father’s house are many rooms. If it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you? And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and will take you to myself, that where I am you may be also.”

That’s where Ralph Bohlmann has been since Sunday evening. That’s where Pat Bohlmann has been since September 14, 2012. That’s where my father and Terry’s parents are. That’s where your loved ones are whose life on earth has ended in faith. That’s where, by the grace of God, you and I will also be someday when our life here on earth is over. And in the place that Jesus has prepared for us, we will spend eternity with him.

Although impossible to confirm veracity beyond the shadow of a doubt, testimonies from people who have gone through what is called a “near death experience” in a place appearing to be heaven give a glimpse of the eternal life awaiting believers in Christ.

These near death experiences occurred when individuals were thought and even in many instances declared to be clinically dead, usually as a result of traumatic injury, drowning, choking, auto accident, etc., but later came back to life.

People who have had such an experience have repeatedly testified, as reported in a book titled “Imagine Heaven,” that they saw a man “wearing a robe of brilliant white light down to his ankles, held together by a gold sash, with piercing eyes that see right into your soul, yet also draw you in with a magnetic warmth and love.” They also experienced reunification with family members, both previously known and unknown.

That sounds an awful lot like the way I picture Jesus and life in heaven. Imagine a life that never ends in the presence of someone who draws you near with warmth and love. That someone is Jesus! Imagine being reunited with loved ones forever. That is heaven!

And how do we get there? One day Jesus saw Thomas, who later doubted that Jesus had really come back to life after his crucifixion and burial. Jesus said to Thomas: “I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.” Jesus is the way to eternal life. Jesus is the only way to eternal life!

Wonder of wonders, miracle of miracles! The Jesus who spent lots of time on earth hanging out with sinners, including prostitutes and tax collectors, looks at you and at me the same way he looked at them. Not as saints whose lives were perfect but as people who are lost and in need of a Savior.

The same Jesus who brought his dear friend Lazarus back to life even after Lazarus had been buried in a tomb for four days has promised to bring us back to life someday. And though Lazarus died again, he, with all believers in Christ, has been given a life that never ends. That’s the life awaiting you, me and all believers in Christ.

So it is that a stranger to Christianity might walk into this beautiful chapel and observe a crowd of people mourning the loss of a beloved father, grandfather and highly respected church leader, yet singing songs without grieving as those who have no hope.

A few moments ago we sang “Abide with me.” It’s a beautiful hymn, solemn in spirit, rich in meaning, courageous in confronting the end of life on earth:

  • Where is death’s sting? Where, grave, thy victory? I triumph still if Thou abide with me!
  • In life, in death, O Lord, abide with me.

And as we say in Texas, we’re fixin’ to sing “O God, our help in ages past, our hope for years to come. Be Thou our guard while troubles last and our eternal home!” I encourage you to sing from your heart the words from this hymn that provide hope for the future.

Sing this hymn with thankful hearts that the God of the universe loved the world so much that he gave his only Son, that everyone might have eternal life! He died for all! That’s the great news we Christians are called to proclaim to the people of the world who live in doubt, in darkness, in despair.

And sing with thanksgiving and joy in your heart that Jesus has gone to prepare a place for you and for me, even as Ralph and Pat Bohlmann already abide in the place he has prepared for them!

My prayer for you, Paul, Lynn, Jesse and Lucas, is that your hearts will be filled with constant hope and quiet joy. Remember the time you spent with the man whose vacated body, redeemed by the blood of Jesus, is in this box. And look forward to the time when you will see him again, in heaven, where life eternal will be yours as well.

In the Name of the Father, of the Son and of the Holy Spirit! Amen!

 

Last Week in Dallas

Screen Shot 2016-07-11 at 1.45.16 PM

Credit: Tony Gutierrez / Associated Press

Today Terry and I return to Texas after being briefly introduced yesterday at the LCMS convention in Milwaukee. Many decisions were made by convention delegates. Perhaps I’ll have some reports and observations regarding these decisions in future Perspectives articles.

For now, I draw your attention to yet another tragic shooting in a seemingly never ending stream of such horrific events. Last Thursday in downtown Dallas five police officers were killed and seven others injured by a sniper. The officers were providing security for a peaceful protest over alleged police violence in various parts of the nation. After a sustained shootout with police, the suspect was killed by a bomb delivered to the suspect’s location by a police robot.

The horrible result of this premeditated, racially motivated, cowardly attack is the traumatic grief experienced, by the spouses, children, parents, friends and co-workers of those who lost their lives in the line of duty. This is yet another episode that leaves law abiding citizens disappointed, distraught and deflated. While gun control measures are again on the minds of many, we all know that anyone bent on death and destruction will find ways to carry out their dastardly deeds.

One week ago today a Perspectives reader emailed to me a reminder that in July 1999, while serving as president of the Texas District LCMS, I had written an article in the Texas Messenger of The Lutheran Witness about the shooting in Littleton, Col. She stated that she still carries that article in her Bible and suggested I reprint it in Perspectives. Because of its length I’ve posted it below as an Addendum. I pray it will be helpful. Here’s one pertinent excerpt from that article:

In the face of such tragedy and trauma, what do we, who believe in the only true God, say to those of our constituency who wonder, question, doubt, search and seek to understand the place of our God at times like these? 

  • We say what we know to be the truth, namely, that the effects of the devil, the world and our flesh combine to produce death and destruction, in sometimes-unimaginable ways.
  • We say that events such as that in Littleton [and Dallas] are clearly outside the will of our gracious God and are the works of fallen humankind, urged and egged on by Satan himself.
  • And we draw people to the only hope for such fallen human beings, God’s grace, lovingly and selflessly given to the world in the person of Jesus Christ, God’s Son, the Savior and Lord of the universe.

Vernon and Betty Gundermann

GundermannsLast Saturday afternoon, June 4, Concordia Lutheran Church in Kirkwood, Missouri, held a special worship service of thanksgiving to God for his servants Vernon and Betty Gundermann. It was my challenging privilege to be the preacher. Sermon title: God’s Gifts. Your Legacy.

It was a privilege because Terry and I were blessed to have Vern for our pastor during our nine years in St. Louis when I served as president of The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod. Vern was an excellent pastor in every respect. I also considered him the best preacher in the LCMS.

Sadly, not all of our nine years were filled with joyful activities and experiences. Particularly during some of my most difficult days in office, I had the “privilege” of receiving communications from or attending meetings with people who my dear Terry aptly describes as “joy suckers.” They sucked the joy right out of life and ministry.

At such times, Pastor Gundermann had an uncanny, almost surreal, perhaps even supernatural way of knowing and feeling the struggles we were experiencing. Incredibly, upon returning from such joy sucking experiences, Terry and I were greeted, virtually every time, with a phone message from our pastor, assuring us of his prayers, his love, his support, his encouragement.

In addition to Vern’s wonderful pastoral ministry of encouragement and support, his dear wife Betty became a very important person in the life of my dear wife Terry. Not many folks who live outside a pastor’s home know or understand the unique concerns, stresses, frustrations and worries of a pastor’s wife. Betty possessed a keen sensitivity to what pastors’ wives were likely to experience, including a pastor’s wife whose husband had become a national church president.

In our toughest times, Betty was there for Terry, to encourage her, to cry with her and to laugh with her. Betty was and to this very day still is an indescribably close friend of my dear Terry.

Preaching at last Saturday’s service was a challenge because Vern’s normal activities and abilities have been altered by the effects of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), more commonly called Lou Gehrig’s disease. Knowing what to say and how to say it was tough. Yet through it all Vern maintains a realistic attitude of joy and thanksgiving. I pray the Spirit blessed my words.

In one of his weekly updates, Vern acknowledged that no longer will he be able to say or sing a single word. He also wrote: “Life is good. Life is changing. Life is good. Do keep Betty in your prayers. Every change for me adds a task to her life! She now shaves me, puts on my socks and so much more. And she does it all with a good spirit. Little did we understand [on June 25, 1961] the words of our marriage vows ‘in sickness and in health.’ It is not easy living with one who cannot speak and whose eyesight is quite dim.”

Last week hundreds gathered to thank God for Vern and Betty Gundermann! It was a day to remember! God has given them many gifts! They will leave a legacy!