Assisting the Poor and Needy

Poverty

We often hear stories about programs for assisting the poor and needy. Some of those stories show the success of such plans. Others show how the system fails and is even abused.

An internet search for “solving the welfare problem in America” produces lots of information on this topic. Here’s one: http://solutions.heritage.org/entitlements/welfare/

When President Lyndon Johnson launched the War on Poverty, he said that it was intended to strike “at the causes, not just the consequences of poverty.” He added, “Our aim is not only to relieve the symptom of poverty, but to cure it and, above all, to prevent it.”

Five decades and $24 trillion later, the welfare system has failed the poor. Poverty rates remain stagnant, and self-sufficiency languishes.

Today the federal government operates roughly 80 means-tested welfare programs that provide cash, food, housing, medical care, and social services to poor and lower-income Americans. Total federal, state, and local government spending on these programs now reaches over $1 trillion annually.

The cost of welfare is unsustainable, and pouring dollars into an ever-increasing number of welfare programs has failed to improve rates of self-sufficiency. It is time to get welfare spending under control and to reform welfare to encourage self-reliance and human thriving in the context of community.

In addition, in one of my computer files I found these statements on this topic, written by an unknown author from an obviously conservative perspective:

  1. You cannot legislate the poor into prosperity by legislating the wealthy out of prosperity.
  2. What one person receives without working for, another person must work for without receiving.
  3. The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else.
  4. You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it!
  5. When half the people get the idea that they do not have to work because the other half is going to take care of them, and when the other half gets the idea that it does no good to work because somebody else is going to get what they work for, that is the beginning of the end of any nation.

These statements may seem a bit harsh and surely do not tell the whole story of human need and how it can be met. Yet governmental, religious, and other public or private agencies need to assist the poor responsibly to avoid harming both givers and receivers.

The Bible says: “There will always be some in the land who are poor…Share freely with the poor and with other Israelites in need.” (Deut. 15:11 – NLT)

The Bible also says: “If any would not work, neither should he eat.” (2 Thess. 3:10 – KJV)

If a poor person is truly unable to work, we who have been abundantly blessed have a duty to assist. If a poor person is truly able to work, to rely on external assistance is hard to justify.

Death and Taxes – Part One

Tax ReturnIt is often said that the only certainties in life are death and taxes. While not generally considered happy topics, a contrarian perspective on each is not to be overlooked. Since today is one day prior to the traditional deadline for filing U.S. Federal Income Tax returns, I thought it appropriate to touch first on this topic. Next week I’ll share some thoughts about death.

Most people are not happy to see April 15 approach. It’s not a lot of fun to face the responsibility of pulling together all the documents, records and receipts necessary for completing a tax return. Those include numerous forms familiar to most of us (1040, W-2, 1099, Schedules A and B) and a whole bunch of additional forms about which many folks never have to worry.

After compiling such documents, the next step is inserting in the proper space on the proper form the numbers contained therein. Some tackle that project themselves. Those who do so may use an electronic aid, such as Turbo Tax or a similar product. Others do it all by themselves.

The rest simply put in a box or bag all the documents they can find and take them to their friendly accountant, happily paying his/her fee to do the rest. Filing an extension (and paying the balance due) or signing the timely form completes that part of the process.

The final step is either enclosing a check for the balance of taxes due or looking forward to a refund from the United States Treasury of the amount in which estimated tax payments have exceeded the actual tax liability. The former is not a pleasant task. The latter is a happier one.

While many are also required to pay a state income tax, we who live in Texas and some other places are seemingly blessed by not having that requirement. Nevertheless, onerous real estate taxes in non-state-income tax states tend to suck away some of the joy of that privilege.

We in America are currently blessed to be able to deduct from our taxable income the amount of our contributions to church or charitable organizations and entities. Like many of you, Terry and I joyfully and generously make many such contributions, which accomplish the dual purpose of furthering the mission of worthy causes and of reducing our tax liability.

What’s the bottom line? For all its pain and pleasure, paying taxes is both a privilege and a responsibility. Jesus said: “Give to Caesar (the government) what belongs to Caesar, and give to God what belongs to God.” (Matt. 22:21, NLT)

For what we give to Caesar, we receive the privileges of living in a country that provides and defends many freedoms and protects life, property and possessions. For what we give to God, we receive the joy of happily returning to him a portion of everything he provides for us.

Perhaps these thoughts will ease the pain of April 15 in your life! Call for additional suggestions.

If I were the Devil: Paul Harvey

Paul Harvey Credit:  Wikipedia

Paul Harvey
Credit: Wikipedia

Several years ago radio commentator Paul Harvey spoke this Warning for a Nation:

If I were the devil, I wouldn’t be happy until I had seized the ripest apple on the tree: thee. So I’d set about however necessary to take over the United States. I’d subvert the churches first. I’d begin with a campaign of whispers. And with the wisdom of a serpent, I’d whisper to you as I whispered to Eve: “Do as you please.”

To the young I would whisper that the Bible is a myth. I would convince them that man created God instead of the other way around. I would confide that what’s bad is good and what’s good is square. And the old I would teach to pray, after me: “Our Father, which art in Washington …”

And then I’d get organized. I’d educate authors in how to make lurid literature exciting so that anything else would appear dull and uninteresting. I’d threaten TV with dirtier movies and vice versa. I’d pedal narcotics to whom I could. I’d sell alcohol to ladies and gentlemen of distinction. I’d tranquilize the rest with pills.

If I were the devil I’d soon have families at war with themselves, churches at war with themselves, and nations at war with themselves, until each in its turn was consumed. And with promises of higher ratings I’d have mesmerizing media fanning the flames.

If I were the devil I would encourage schools to refine young intellects, but neglect to discipline emotions. Just let those run wild, until before you knew it, you’d have to have drug-sniffing dogs and metal detectors at every schoolhouse door.

Within a decade, I’d have prisons overflowing. I’d have judges promoting pornography. Soon I could evict God from the courthouse, then from the schoolhouse, and then from the houses of Congress. And in His own churches I would substitute psychology for religion and deify science. I would lure priests and pastors into misusing boys and girls and church money.

If I were the devil I’d make the symbol of Easter an egg and the symbol of Christmas a bottle.
If I were the devil I’d take from those who have and give to those who want it until I had killed the incentive of the ambitious. And what’ll you bet I couldn’t get whole states to promote gambling as the way to get rich?

I would caution against extremes, and hard work, and patriotism, and moral conduct. I would convince the young that marriage is old-fashioned, that swinging is more fun, that what you see on TV is the way to be. And thus I could undress you in public, and I could lure you into bed, with diseases for which there is no cure.

In other words, if I were the devil, I’d just keep right on doing what he’s doing!

Paul Harvey. Good day!

Jerry Kieschnick Signature

Dr. Gerald B. (Jerry) Kieschnick
One Lord, One Faith, One Baptism – Eph. 4:5
For previous issues of Perspectives go to www.jerrykieschnick.wordpress.com