Half-Truths

Lie Note Directory Marking Arrow Truth Direction

Credit: Max Pixel

One of the greatest challenges of a listener is to discern the truthfulness of what is spoken. That’s not always easy. Some speakers speak half-truths.

Here are a few definitions of half-truth:

  • “A statement that is only partly true, especially one intended to deceive, evade blame, or the like … a statement that fails to divulge the whole truth.” (Dictionary.com)
  • “A statement, especially one intended to deceive, that omits some of the facts necessary for a full description or account.” (Your Dictionary.com)
  • “A deceptive statement that includes some element of truth. The statement might be partly true, the statement may be totally true but only part of the whole truth, or it may use some deceptive element … especially if the intent is to deceive, evade, blame, or misrepresent the truth.” (Wikipedia.com)

Notice the common thread in these definitions? They all include the element of deception. Here are a couple examples of half-truths:

  • “You should not trust Peter with your children. I once saw him smack a child with his open hand.” In this example the statement could be true, but Peter may have slapped the child on the back because he was choking.
  • “I’m a really good driver. In the past thirty years, I’ve gotten only four speeding tickets.” Statement may be true, but is deceptive if speaker started driving a week ago.

Most speakers say at least some things that are true but not all speakers say everything that needs to be said about the topic they are addressing. When that happens, the listener hears only part of what needs to be heard to be fully informed and to make subsequent decisions.

In my life and career I’ve heard many speeches and presentations. If I don’t know anything about the topic being presented, I’m inclined to believe what I hear, especially if the speaker occupies a position of trust and responsibility.

On the other hand, when a speaker presents a topic with which I am quite familiar, it’s much easier to discern when he or she is presenting only half-truths. In that case, I know that the speaker is omitting certain details that, if divulged, would result in the speaker needing to accept the responsibility he or she is trying to evade by speaking half-truths.

Wise Old Testament King Solomon said: “He who speaks the truth declares what is right, but a false witness speaks deceit.” Prov. 12:17 There’s that word “deceit” again—“the action or practice of deceiving someone by concealing or misrepresenting the truth.”

Half-truths. Not good, to say the least.

St. Paul writes: “Then we will no longer be infants, tossed about by the waves and carried around by every wind of teaching and by the clever cunning of men in their deceitful scheming. Instead, speaking the truth in love, we will in all things grow up into Christ Himself, who is the head.” Eph. 4:14-15

That’s a much better way! God bless your day!

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Death and Taxes – Part One

Tax ReturnIt is often said that the only certainties in life are death and taxes. While not generally considered happy topics, a contrarian perspective on each is not to be overlooked. Since today is one day prior to the traditional deadline for filing U.S. Federal Income Tax returns, I thought it appropriate to touch first on this topic. Next week I’ll share some thoughts about death.

Most people are not happy to see April 15 approach. It’s not a lot of fun to face the responsibility of pulling together all the documents, records and receipts necessary for completing a tax return. Those include numerous forms familiar to most of us (1040, W-2, 1099, Schedules A and B) and a whole bunch of additional forms about which many folks never have to worry.

After compiling such documents, the next step is inserting in the proper space on the proper form the numbers contained therein. Some tackle that project themselves. Those who do so may use an electronic aid, such as Turbo Tax or a similar product. Others do it all by themselves.

The rest simply put in a box or bag all the documents they can find and take them to their friendly accountant, happily paying his/her fee to do the rest. Filing an extension (and paying the balance due) or signing the timely form completes that part of the process.

The final step is either enclosing a check for the balance of taxes due or looking forward to a refund from the United States Treasury of the amount in which estimated tax payments have exceeded the actual tax liability. The former is not a pleasant task. The latter is a happier one.

While many are also required to pay a state income tax, we who live in Texas and some other places are seemingly blessed by not having that requirement. Nevertheless, onerous real estate taxes in non-state-income tax states tend to suck away some of the joy of that privilege.

We in America are currently blessed to be able to deduct from our taxable income the amount of our contributions to church or charitable organizations and entities. Like many of you, Terry and I joyfully and generously make many such contributions, which accomplish the dual purpose of furthering the mission of worthy causes and of reducing our tax liability.

What’s the bottom line? For all its pain and pleasure, paying taxes is both a privilege and a responsibility. Jesus said: “Give to Caesar (the government) what belongs to Caesar, and give to God what belongs to God.” (Matt. 22:21, NLT)

For what we give to Caesar, we receive the privileges of living in a country that provides and defends many freedoms and protects life, property and possessions. For what we give to God, we receive the joy of happily returning to him a portion of everything he provides for us.

Perhaps these thoughts will ease the pain of April 15 in your life! Call for additional suggestions.