Semiannual Time Change – A Pain in the Neck!

Screen Shot 2018-03-14 at 10.14.47 AM

The main purpose of changing from Standard Time to Daylight Saving Time (DST) is to make better use of daylight. At this time of year we reset our clocks to move an hour of daylight from morning to evening. According to some sources, DST saves energy. Others refute that claim.

The first person to propose this idea was New Zealand entomologist George Hudson, in 1895. He wanted more after-hours daylight to collect insects. British outdoorsman William Willett made a similar proposal in 1905. Neither idea at that time became law or common practice.

However, many countries did adopt DST during the early 20th century. Some abandoned it in the years after the end of World War I. Notable exceptions included Canada, the UK, France, and Ireland. DST resurfaced in North America and Europe during and after World War II.

Daylight Saving Time was adopted in the U.S. on March 19, 1918, and repealed in 1919. During World War II, President Franklin Roosevelt instituted year-round DST (Feb. 9, 1942-Sept. 20, 1945). From 1945-1966 there was no federal law regarding DST. Numerous subsequent laws on this matter were enacted in 1966, 1973, 1974, and 1975. Check the Internet for details.

Most Americans now set their clocks forward on the second Sunday in March and backward on the first Sunday in November. Including wall clocks, clock radios, oven clock, microwave clock, grandfather clock, automobile clocks, and wrist watches, in our home I changed 23 time-keeping instruments late last Saturday night. That’s not bragging. It’s complaining.

Frankly, in my opinion and that of most folks I know, this time change twice a year is a pain in the neck! This quote expresses my thoughts: “The benefits of changing our clocks twice a year are not compelling. Work is becoming more flexible and people increasingly set their own schedules. We even watch TV shows, once a big determinant of the time we kept, on our own time. We are no longer slaves to the official time, so why change it twice each year?”

Except for Navajo tribal lands, Arizona does not observe DST. Neither do Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. On the other hand, Florida is considering permanent DST. So are Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts.

I think all states should do the same. If you agree, contact your state representative. Do it now!

By the way, if you think daylight saving time issues are only relatively recent, check Joshua 10:13.

Thank you for your time and attention. God bless your day!


The Gospel According to a Deck of Cards


This sermon outline was shared with me by Pastor Jim Fandrey, who served on the LCMS Board of Directors during my years as LCMS president. I thought you might find it of interest.

2 Timothy 3:16 All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness.

God gives us his Word in the Bible, Holy Scripture.  There’s a lot to absorb in all 66 books, from Genesis through Revelation.  We cherish and revere the Bible, because it tells us about what God has done for us and for our salvation.  But there is so much to remember.  Maybe this morning, we all would be helped, if we would learn . . .


  1. God reveals himself to us through his Word
    • Ace: one God
    • Deuce: Bible divided into two parts: Old Testament and New Testament
    • Trey: Holy Trinity: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit
    • Four: Evangelists: Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John
  2. Are we wise or foolish, when we hear God’s Word?
    • Five: five wise virgins, out of ten; faith was burning and they entered the kingdom at the Lord’s invitation
    • Five foolish virgins, with faith extinguished, were locked out
  3. God promises to provide us with all that we need to support this body and life
    • Six: the days of creation
    • Seven: God rested, the model for our Sabbath rest
  4. God assures us: his mercy never ends, and we must be grateful
    • Eight: the people saved on Noah’s ark, the people who received the promise
    • Nine: the unthankful cleansed lepers; only one returned to give thanks
  5. In God’s Word we receive both Law and Gospel
    • Ten: the Ten Commandments
    • Jack: knave and devil, defeated by Jesus
    • Queen: Mary, mother of our Lord
    • King: Jesus, King of kings and Lord of lords

Perhaps you’ll think about this the next time you see a deck of cards. God bless your day!

Quo Vadis, LCMS?


That’s the title of a presentation I offered this past week at the Best Practices for Ministry Conference in Phoenix. Hosted by Christ Church Lutheran (that’s their correct name), this conference is now the largest single conference in The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod. Christ Church provides the venue, meals, atmosphere, and opportunity for over 2,200 people, pastors and educators to gather and to share ideas and best practices for mission and ministry.

My presentation, subtitled: Wine, Women, Worship, Witness, Warfare, was based on the question “Where are you going, LCMS?” Here are a few excerpts:

Introduction: During the past 52 years I’ve served The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod in numerous capacities. Throughout those years I’ve experienced its strength, beauty, and weakness. Today I share my heartfelt perspectives on matters that hinder the health and growth of our beloved synod. I pray this offering will stimulate healthy, responsible, evangelical conversation among us, to the glory of God and the building of his Church on earth.

Wine: [In our Synod] the Lord’s Supper has become a source of division and offense rather than the expression of unity and powerful force for conversion and spiritual sustenance it is intended to be. Unless and until we resolve the issue of what is called “close” or “closed” communion among us, the LCMS will continue to be seen as a group of separatistic sectarians and will continue to bring unnecessary offense to repentant Christian sinners who hunger and thirst after the miraculous and life giving blessings offered in this precious gift of God.

Women: I’m not arguing for a de facto reversal of our Synod’s position against ordination of women. I’m simply saying that women in Holy Scripture appear to have been entrusted with greater responsibility than our Synod has given to women today, e.g., the role of prophetess. We cannot ignore the exodus from our church body of spiritually gifted women who see our position of limiting the role of women as, at best, not clearly supported by Scripture and, at worst, misogynistic.

Worship: Some in our Synod maintain that the only true and pure worship must come exclusively from officially approved Synod hymnals. Others obviously disagree. Congregations utilizing a variety of worship formats are experiencing an amazingly high percentage of all new adult confirmations in the Synod. The implications of such objective facts cannot be ignored.

Witness: There must be no compromise, no apology, no confusion about our Christian witness whenever we have the opportunity to share it by “offering prayers, speaking, and reading Scripture” in public gatherings. Unless and until we in the LCMS get over our reticence and reluctance to give witness to Christ anytime, anywhere, under any circumstance, using testimony, dialog, prayer, preaching, or any other means of communication, we will fail to demonstrate the boldness and compassion so desperately needed by people in our country and world who live in darkness, desperation, and despair.

Warfare: When the unbelieving world sees and hears how disrespectfully we treat one another, they want nothing to do with us. All the insistence in the world about pure doctrine pales into insignificance when outsiders fail to see what we proclaim … that we love one another.

My Best Practices presentation was a slightly revised version of an article published by Lutheran Society for Missiology in the May 2017 edition of Lutheran Mission Matters, available at