Fourth of July

July 4

Next Tuesday is the Fourth of July, commemorating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence in 1776 by the Continental Congress. It’s a day to celebrate American freedom.

Not everyone is as patriotic as you and I would like them to be. During football season last fall, numerous NFL players protested the national anthem by either kneeling during the anthem or raising their fists. Perhaps you were as chagrined as I by these disrespectful actions.

One man did something more than keep his thoughts to himself. Ret. Marine Col. Jeffery Powers wrote to the NFL commissioners, originally sending his letter to former Florida congressman Allen West, who posted the letter to his news website. Here are excerpts from that letter:

Commissioners,

I’ve been a season pass holder at Yankee Stadium, Yale Bowl and Giants Stadium. I missed the ’90-’91 season because I was with a battalion of Marines in Desert Storm. Fourteen of my wonderful Marines returned home with the American Flag draped across their lifeless bodies. Many friends, Marines, and Special Forces Soldiers who worked with or for me through the years returned home with the American Flag draped over their coffins.

Now I watch multi-millionaire athletes who never did anything in their lives but play a game disrespect what brave Americans fought and died for. They are essentially spitting in the faces and on the graves of real men, men who have actually done something for this country beside playing with a ball and believing they’re something special! They’re not! My Marines and Soldiers were!

Legends and heroes do NOT wear shoulder pads. They wear body armor and carry rifles.

They make minimum wage and spend months and years away from their families. They don’t do it for an hour on Sunday. They do it 24/7 often with lead, not footballs, coming in their direction. They watch their brothers carted off in pieces not on a gurney to get their knee iced. They don’t have ice. Many don’t have legs or arms.

Some wear blue and risk their lives daily on the streets of America. They wear fire helmets and go upstairs into the fire rather than down to safety. On 9-11, hundreds vanished. They are the heroes.

So on this Fourth of July, join me in thanking God for the freedoms we enjoy and for those who dedicate their lives to defend those freedoms. Perhaps this video will help. Listen till the very end: https://www.youtube.com/embed/B2AEkfjc6-o?feature=player_detailpage

Happy Independence Day!

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Prayer Shaming

Prayer

In the wake of ongoing acts of terror that have become almost daily events in places around the world, it’s heartening to see responses of young people. Although perhaps a bit naïve in some respects, they are to be commended for speaking out about such important matters as prayer.

This past week I saw a Facebook posting from a group of Catholic High School students. It uses the increasingly popular format of numerous individual students, each holding one sheet of paper, with printed words that, viewed sequentially, form a message. The title of this one is “prayer shaming.” Each line represents the content of one or more hand held pages.

The secret of Christian living is love. Only love fills the empty spaces caused by evil.
Our generation doesn’t remember life before September 11 but we’ll never be able to forget life after it.
What’s terrifying about San Bernardino, Newtown, and so many others…
…is the shattering sameness of them.
It seems like every week there’s another report of death and destruction.
Many ask, “Where was God when that shooting happened?”
Until we realize that we’ve told God to leave.
So many have told God that he’s not welcome in public, on TV, in schools.
We’re told our “thoughts and prayers” shouldn’t be with the victims…
…that “prayers” should be reserved for “forgiveness.”
It’s as if a new trend is sweeping the country – “Prayer shaming.”
Football players are glorified for drugs and immoral actions.
But a football player talks about his faith and he’s judged.
On college campuses students are told to hide their faith so they don’t “offend” anyone.
So today, we as students of East Catholic High School – and as Americans – are taking a stand.
We encourage people of all faiths to stand together, and to pray.
Pray for the victims.
Pray for the families.
Pray for our First Amendment, that lets us all pray freely.
Pray for safety.
Pray for peace.
Pray that God is allowed back into our lives, without the prayer shame.
And pray that we may once again become one nation, under God, indivisible…
…with liberty and justice for all.

Possible or even probable collateral naivety aside, I say, “Right on, young friends in Christ!”

Lessons Learned

My family and many of my friends know that although my taste in music is a bit eclectic, I mostly favor country and western and love songs. When I’m in the car on the road I pick my favorite Sirius channel, turn up the volume a bit, and sing to my heart’s content. I don’t know all the words to all the songs but that doesn’t stop me from trying to sing along.

One recent morning on the way to my office at Legacy Deo I was listening to Prime Country, mostly C&W songs I’ve known for years. That particular morning I heard Tracy Lawrence’s rendition of Lessons Learned. I thought the words worth sharing, so here we go:

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I was ten years old the day I got caught with some dime store candy that I never bought.
I hung my head and I faced the wall as Daddy showed me wrong from right.
He said this hurts me more than it does you. There’s just some things son, that you just don’t do.
Is anything I’m sayin’ gettin’ through? Daddy, I can see the light.

Oh lessons learned, man they sure run deep. They don’t go away and they don’t come cheap.
Oh, there’s no way around it, cause this world turns … on lessons learned.

Granddaddy was a man I loved. He bought me my first ball and glove,
Even taught me how to drive his old truck, circling that ol’ town square.
He spoke of life with a slow southern drawl. I never heard him cause I knew it all.
But I sure listened when I got the call … that he was no longer there.

Oh, lessons learned, man they sure run deep. They don’t go away and they don’t come cheap.
Oh, there’s no way around it, cause this world turns … on lessons learned.

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Many of us have learned lessons similar to those articulated in this song. Whether doing the stuff we knew was wrong or taking loved ones for granted or maybe even things that could be considered much more serious, lessons were learned, sometimes the hard way.

My father taught me many lessons during his lifetime of 66 years, six months, and four days. I also learned many lessons from my mother, still living today at the tender age of 101 years, two months, and five days. Lessons learned also came from my dear wife, children, grandchildren, pastors, teachers, peers, and friends. I thank God for all these special people in my life!

Even more significantly, I have learned lessons from the pages of Holy Scripture, many from the red-lettered words of Jesus himself such as these from his Sermon on the Mount (Matt. 5:3-10):

Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Blessed are those who mourn, for they will be comforted.
Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth.
Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled.
Blessed are the merciful, for they will be shown mercy.
Blessed are the pure in heart, for they will see God.
Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called sons of God.
Blessed are those who are persecuted because of righteousness, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

The Enemy from Within

Today’s quote is from a first century BC philosopher and politician:

“A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for s/he is known and carries his/her banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the gate freely, his/her sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself. For the traitor appears not a traitor; s/he speaks in accents familiar to his/her victims, and s/he wears their face and their arguments, s/he appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men (and women). S/He rots the soul of a nation, s/he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars of the city, s/he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist. A murderer is less to fear.”

― Marcus Tullius Cicero

Here are a few comments about Cicero’s life from the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy:

Marcus Tullius Cicero was born January 3, 106 BC and was murdered December 7, 43 BC. His life coincided with the decline and fall of the Roman Republic and he was an important actor in many of the significant political events of his time. His writings are now a valuable source of information to us about those events.

He was, among other things, an orator, lawyer, politician, and philosopher. Making sense of his writings and understanding his philosophy requires us to keep that in mind.

While Cicero is currently not considered an exceptional thinker, largely on the (incorrect) grounds that his philosophy is derivative and unoriginal, in previous centuries he was considered one of the great philosophers of the ancient era and was widely read well into the 19th century.

Probably the most notable example of his influence is St. Augustine’s claim that it was Cicero’s Hortensius (an exhortation to philosophy, the text of which is unfortunately lost) that turned him away from his sinful life and toward philosophy and ultimately to God.

Cicero’s warning 2,000 years ago: “A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within.” Could that be true in both the world and the church today?

Ten Things that Will Disappear in Our Lifetimes

Disappear

Perhaps you’ve already seen this interesting and provocative prognostication. Author is unknown. Comments below each item are edited for brevity. My brief comments are at the end.

1. The Post Office

The Postal Service is so deeply in financial trouble that there is probably no way to sustain it long term. Email, Fed Ex, and UPS have just about wiped out the minimum revenue needed to keep the post office alive. Most of our mail every day is junk mail and bills.

2. The Check

It costs the financial system billions of dollars a year to process checks. Plastic cards and online transactions will lead to the eventual demise of the check. If you never paid your bills by mail and never received them by mail, the post office would surely go out of business.

3. The Newspaper

The younger generation simply doesn’t read the newspaper. They certainly don’t subscribe to a daily delivered print edition. That may go the way of the milkman and the laundry man. As for reading the paper online, get ready to pay for it.

4. The Book

Some say they will never give up the physical book they hold in their hands. Many said the same thing about downloading music from iTunes. But they quickly changed their minds when they discovered they could get albums for half the price without ever leaving home to get the latest music. The same thing will happen with books. And the price is less than half that of a real book.

5. The Land Line Telephone

Unless one has a large family and makes a lot of local calls, it’s not needed anymore. Most people keep it simply because they’ve always had it. But now most cell phone companies allow unlimited local and long distance calling at no extra charge.

6. Music

This is one of the saddest parts of the change story. The music industry is dying a slow death.  Not just because of illegal downloading. It’s the lack of innovative new music being given a chance to get to the people who would like to hear it. Greed and corruption are the problem.

7. Television Revenues

Viewing of programs on national networks is down dramatically. People are watching TV and movies streamed from their computers. And they’re playing games and doing lots of other things that take up the time that used to be spent watching TV.  Cable rates are skyrocketing and commercials run about every 4 minutes and 30 seconds.

8. The “Things” You Own

Many of the very possessions that we used to own are still in our lives, but we may not actually own them in the future. Many “possessions” are virtual and already simply reside in “the cloud.” If we save something, it is saved in the cloud, sometimes free, often with a monthly subscription fee.  In this virtual world, could it all disappear at any moment in a big “poof?”

9. Joined Handwriting (Cursive Writing)

Cursive writing is already gone in some schools that no longer teach “joined handwriting.” Nearly everything is done now on computers or keyboards of some type (pun not intended).

10. Privacy

There are cameras on the street, in most of the buildings, and even built into computers and cell phones. In reality, someone knows who you are and where you are, right down to the GPS coordinates, and the Google Street View. If you buy something, your habit is put into a zillion profiles, and your ads will change to reflect those habits. “They” will try to get you to buy something else, again and again and again.

You may or may not agree with any or all of these projections. I don’t agree with #6. Music will survive. Some of the rest are already reality. Others may occur in the future. Time will tell.

What would our grandparents have thought if someone had told them that an automobile would be able to start with no keys in hand, stop itself with no one applying the brake, and park itself with no one touching the wheel? All those things are happening today. Not all of them are bad.

So stay tuned. And stay grounded. Technology is changing how we live and also how long we live. Possessions are finite. Life is real. Life is fragile. Life is precious. Life is a gift of God. His love for his world and for his people never changes.