Hurricane Katrina and Louisiana Flooding


Baton Rouge Flooding

Credit: John Oubre / The Advocate

This week Monday marked the 11th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina’s landfall on August 29, 2005, in southeast Louisiana. That horrendous storm strengthened to a Category 5 hurricane over the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico, but weakened before making its second landfall as a Category 3 hurricane on August 29 in southeast Louisiana. Wikipedia provides details:

Katrina was the eleventh named storm and fifth hurricane of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season. It was the costliest natural disaster and one of the five deadliest hurricanes in the history of the United States. The storm is currently ranked as the third most intense United States land falling tropical cyclone, behind only the 1935 Labor Day hurricane and Hurricane Camille in 1969.

Overall, at least 1,245 people died in the hurricane and subsequent floods, making it the deadliest United States hurricane since the 1928 Okeechobee hurricane. Total property damage was estimated at $108 billion, roughly four times the damage wrought by Hurricane Andrew in 1992.

Katrina caused severe destruction along the Gulf coast from central Florida to Texas, much of it due to the storm surge and levee failure. Severe property damage occurred in coastal areas, such as Mississippi beachfront towns; over 90 percent of these were flooded. Boats and casino barges rammed buildings, pushing cars and houses inland; water reached 6–12 miles from the beach.

Over fifty breaches in New Orleans hurricane surge protection were the cause of the majority of the death and destruction during Katrina. Eventually 80% of the city and large tracts of neighboring parishes became flooded, and the floodwaters lingered for weeks.

In addition, earlier this month the state of Louisiana suffered heavy flooding from torrential rainfall that caused rivers to overflow their banks, leaving many people homeless. In one part of Livingston Parish, more than 31 inches of rain fell in 15 hours.

One Red Cross worker said, “Thousands of people in Louisiana have lost everything they own and need our help now!” Disaster relief folks from numerous congregations and agencies of our church body have responded with volunteers and monetary support, yet many of those affected have no flood insurance. The need is great for human and financial resources!

For more information on how you can help, go to http://southernlcms.org/southern-district-deploys-district-disaster-response-coordinator/.

Although Terry and I have never directly experienced damage and destruction from flooding, my mother’s home in New Braunfels flooded twice in four years. Through her experience we’ve seen up close the heartache and financial burden that result. Thank you and God bless you for responding in any way possible to help those facing this time of personal loss and need!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s